Our Stories

Learning about the history of the Milton-Ulladulla area is much more than reading through lists of dates, names and facts. Every place has its unique stories – stories that explain why a place is what it is today. They bring to life the character of the people who have lived there and how, over centuries, they have interacted with and changed their local environment.

The stories of Milton-Ulladulla are the stories of its Aboriginal indigenous inhabitants, of the early settlers who came here in the 1800s and their descendants and, because even yesterday is now history, the more recent stories of the many people who have chosen to call this part of the New South Wales South Coast their home through the 20th and 21st centuries.

From Bendalong to Bawley Point, Conjola to Croobyar, Turmeil to Tabourie Lake, and Yatte Yattah to Yadboro, and from the Dreamtime to today, here are the stories of our place.

People Places Events Industries

Sarah Claydon – midwife, nurse and friend to all

Sickness was the true scourge of the pioneers, with diphtheria, convulsions, scarlet fever and measles often causing the deaths of young children. Many women also died from complications of childbirth as there were no doctors. When Sarah Claydon arrived in Milton-Ulladulla in 1851, she began to care for those in her community who needed her most.

Milton’s ‘Angel of Mercy’, Sister Kitty Porter

As a young Australian soldier lay dying, mortally wounded by shrapnel during the ill-fated Gallipoli campaign, Sister Kitty Porter stayed after her regular nursing shift on the hospital ship to care for and comfort him. Those “terrible days” early on in Australia’s participation in World War 1 marked the beginning of Kitty Porter’s four years of selfless war service in Egypt and France. 

Bernard Brown: Milton Ulladulla District’s first policeman

Bernard Brown, ancestor of a number of Milton Ulladulla residents, arrived in NSW as a free settler in November, 1848. His diaries, diligently maintained for well over two decades, were treasured by his descendants and later passed on to the Mitchell library. They have been a valuable resource for researching the history of the Shoalhaven District. Being of humble birth and having limited education, his writing, spelling and punctuation make deciphering his diaries a little like reading hieroglyphics.