Our Stories

Learning about the history of the Milton-Ulladulla area is much more than reading through lists of dates, names and facts. Every place has its unique stories – stories that explain why a place is what it is today. They bring to life the character of the people who have lived there and how, over centuries, they have interacted with and changed their local environment.

The stories of Milton-Ulladulla are the stories of its Aboriginal indigenous inhabitants, of the early settlers who came here in the 1800s and their descendants and, because even yesterday is now history, the more recent stories of the many people who have chosen to call this part of the New South Wales South Coast their home through the 20th and 21st centuries.

From Bendalong to Bawley Point, Conjola to Croobyar, Turmeil to Tabourie Lake, and Yatte Yattah to Yadboro, and from the Dreamtime to today, here are the stories of our place.

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A Milton ‘institution’, Matron Gwenda Porter

Gwenda Porter arrived in Milton by bus in 1940 and was said to have told the bus driver that she would be back on it the next day after seeing how small the town and hospital were. Instead, she stayed on as Matron at Milton Ulladulla Hospital for the next 32 years, retiring in 1972 and then continuing to live in the district until her death.

Horses benefit from Bills’ generosity

At the back of the Milton Showground on Croobyar Road is a simple horse trough with the inscription ‘Donated by Annis & George Bills, Australia‘. It is one of an estimated 7,000 troughs around Australia that were financed from the Estate of George Bills, who died in1927.

Latest Articles

  • Ulladulla’s famous Funland, and Rowen’s Arcade

    In the late 1940s and early 1950s, with my wife Doreen, we would spend many weekends in the Milton-Ulladulla area, spear fishing and water skiing. When King’s Point was subdivided, we had the first house built there by Millard and Ingold builders, as a weekender.

  • Farewell Joanne Ewin

    The Milton Ulladulla Historical Society (MUHS) recently lost one of its highly-valued Life Members with the passing of Joanne Ewin on 24 January 2018, a well-known and respected member of the Milton-Ulladulla community and a past secretary of MUHS.

  • Have you found Millards Creek Weir, Ulladulla?

    Have you seen a piece of Ulladulla’s history, existing since 1861, near a busy road, but only noticed by a few pedestrians? It is the weir over Millards Creek, 20 metres off St Vincent Street, looking west.

  • Heritage trees in Milton Ulladulla

    The heritage fig in Milton is a well-known landmark and much loved by locals and visitors and the historic elm outside the Anglican church is also an important part of Milton’s history.

  • Milton Ulladulla in 1883

    On 20 January 1883, the popular broadsheet publication ‘Australian Town and Country Journal’ published a unique insight into the district of Milton-Ulladulla. Called ‘Southern Pencillings’ and attributed to ‘The Raven’, it included several line drawings featuring Pigeon House mountain, Lake Conjola, Airlie House and Ulladulla Harbour.